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Eagle Owl
09-22-2010, 11:42 PM
Yesterday while hawking we came across a couple of dangers. When we first got to the field we were hawking, the drainage ditch had some standing water and all 3 birds went on a frog catching spree. While Krys was trying to trade the birds off the frogs, Mario took this picture of a cottonmouth slithering away from all the commotion.


http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Cottonmouth_09212010.jpg



Once we got all the birds away from the frog fest, we hit the field and then ran into this wasp nest.

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Wasps_09212010.jpg


We have run into quite a few wasp nests this year. Krys usually turns over rocks, boards, whatever we run into to see if there are any furry critters hiding. Well, after a couple of rocks yielded wasp nests, he stopped doing that. :D

EricADugan
09-22-2010, 11:48 PM
Your snake is not a Cottonmouth, its a Water Snake.
Eric

Roper
09-22-2010, 11:59 PM
this is why I dont usually get my birds going until after October 31 as this stuff has come and usually gone for the winter..

Dirthawking
09-23-2010, 12:23 AM
Your snake is not a Cottonmouth, its a Water Snake.
Eric


No, Brandi identified it correctly. http://www.houstonherp.com/Cottonmouth.htm

zx2run
09-23-2010, 12:29 AM
I would tend to agree with Eric on his ID.
http://www.houstonherp.com/BlotchedWS.html

But either way it is a cool pic!

cwd56
09-23-2010, 12:46 AM
Looks like a water snake to me as well. We used to see ALOT of both out fishing when I lived in Arkansas, they will get after your fish on the stringer if you don't watch em. It's head doesn't appear to be the right shape and the stripes on the bottom jaw look to be more like a water snakes than that of a cottonmouths.

Brandi, do ya'll come across any rattlesnake's around there? I had never seen a rattler around Lubbock before, but almost stepped on a 5 footer a few weeks ago scouting a place out. Needless to say, I'll be avoiding any of our "canyon" areas until it gets cold.

wyodjm
09-23-2010, 01:02 AM
It's a water snake. Among other things, the shape of the head and the striping on the lower labials on the bottom jaw.

Cool picture.

Lowachi
09-23-2010, 01:51 AM
I would tend to agree with Eric on his ID.
http://www.houstonherp.com/BlotchedWS.html

But either way it is a cool pic!

from the pix, I'd say water snake as well. An open mouth shot would help, but....:eek:. Have lots of both up here on the river. That's what I like about snow,, ya don't see that stuff. You guys be careful. We got bunnies ta snuff in Dodge together. And I don't care who's watchin' the yard ta do it!!!

Chris Proctor
09-23-2010, 03:25 AM
Your snake is not a Cottonmouth, its a Water Snake.
Eric

Exactly..

nebli
09-23-2010, 04:05 AM
It's a water snake. Among other things, the shape of the head and the striping on the lower labials on the bottom jaw.

Cool picture.
right on spot

Dakota
09-23-2010, 10:44 AM
http://www.umass.edu/nrec/snake_pit/images/water.jpg (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0WTefd4Z5tMHQ8AF62jzbkF/SIG=1280b2fob/EXP=1285339384/**http%3a//www.umass.edu/nrec/snake_pit/images/water.jpg) Is this it?

PeteJ
09-23-2010, 11:30 AM
It's a water snake. Among other things, the shape of the head and the striping on the lower labials on the bottom jaw.

Cool picture.
I would concur with the assessment by Dan. The dark edging to the scales on the lower lip are the give away on this species, not to mention the smooth edge of the spotting on the dorsal side of the snake's back. The cottonmouth has more jagged and less rounded markings.

Eagle Owl
09-23-2010, 11:30 AM
Sorry for the miss ID on the snake. When I first saw it I thought it was a yellow-bellied water snake because that is what we usually see in the field. My birds have also caught several over the years. But when we saw the picture I was informed that I was wrong and it was a cottonmouth. Oh well. Live and learn.

Roper, we do have rattlesnakes here, but the are not real common here in the city. If you go just outside the city, you will find lots of them, though. My dad has a ranch just north of here, and he has lots of rattlers and copperheads there (been bitten 5 times by copperheads). Here are a couple of pictures taken at my dad's a couple of years ago.

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/TOD%20Pics/TOD%20Campout%20at%20the%20Ranch/Rattler1.jpg

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/TOD%20Pics/TOD%20Campout%20at%20the%20Ranch/Rattler2.jpg

michaelberan
09-23-2010, 01:08 PM
Caught this big girl the other night after stepping on her!

http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i71/Titaniumtalons/100_2165.jpg
http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i71/Titaniumtalons/100_2164.jpg
http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i71/Titaniumtalons/100_2167.jpg

EricADugan
09-23-2010, 01:22 PM
Nice Rattlesnakes Brandi. I would love to have ranch land that has a good population of snakes.

Micheal, that's a water snake as well. You guys are finding alot of those things.

Thanks for posting the snake pics, I love to see what you guys are finding in other parts of the country.

Here are a couple more snake pics from in the field.

West Coast Parrot Snake - Navajoa, Sonora.
http://fototime.com/796F84FF480AF22/standard.jpg

Baja Collard Lizard - Gonzaga Bay, Baja Norte. Not a snake but one of the coolest lizards in the west in my opinion. They prey mostly on smaller lizards.
http://fototime.com/ACA16482AE01CB4/standard.jpg

Speckled Racer - Alamos, Sonora. You guys in South Texas have these down there as well. An insane snake for sure.
http://fototime.com/3BA1C02B5187856/standard.jpg

tampamatt
09-23-2010, 03:22 PM
Looking at the racer is like one of those 3D popout images, messes up my eyes! Awesome pics.

MarkT
09-23-2010, 04:00 PM
Looking at the racer is like one of those 3D popout images, messes up my eyes! Awesome pics.

Just imagine when it gets moving.

wyodjm
09-23-2010, 09:31 PM
Here are a couple more snake pics from in the field.

Baja Collard Lizard - Gonzaga Bay, Baja Norte. Not a snake but one of the coolest lizards in the west in my opinion. They prey mostly on smaller lizards.

Beautiful lizard. Crotaphytus vestigium. At one time, I used to breed collared lizards. I used to have a large group of Bajas and some Baja intergrades. I used to get some wild looking collared lizard babies. Very, very cool animals.



Speckled Racer - Alamos, Sonora. You guys in South Texas have these down there as well. An insane snake for sure.


Another beautiful animal. They are also known as buttermilk snakes. Very cool animal also.

Thanks for sharing the pictures.

Dan

longwinger2010
09-26-2010, 05:16 PM
You're right....it's a Common Water Snake...Natrix natrix. I've had enough bites by those little stinkers to know them from a Cottonmouth in a second.

Either way...I still avoid them only because if they don't bite you...they will most certainly musk all over you and STIIIIIIIINK up the place bigtime !

Eagle Owl
09-26-2010, 11:12 PM
You're right....it's a Common Water Snake...Natrix natrix. I've had enough bites by those little stinkers to know them from a Cottonmouth in a second.

Either way...I still avoid them only because if they don't bite you...they will most certainly musk all over you and STIIIIIIIINK up the place bigtime !

I looked up Natrix natrix and the snake looks nothing like the one we saw and it says it is only found in the UK.confusedd

Zarafia
09-26-2010, 11:30 PM
I am not so good with snake IDs.
Here we have a six foot girl who looks a lot like our diamondback. We have many "banded watersnakes,". They look nothing like our cottonmouth.
I always thought that cottonmouths would be dark colored. But the one we have isn't.
I will get pics if I can, I think that they might be a good thing. Our big girl looks so much like a rattlesnake that I doubt that anybody could make the mistake. She looks like nothing besides a big pit viper.

PeteJ
09-26-2010, 11:54 PM
They changed the genera of our native water snake species many years ago. It is no longer in the Natrix genus. The Natrix of Europe is a much nicer snake, in many ways similar to our Garter Snake in disposition..not nearly as bitey. Get much larger in some cases. I caught one in the area north of Athens, Greece that was 5 feet long and quite thick...beautiful coloring with much smoother scales than our Garters have. Others were more in the size of Garter Snakes here...3 feet long was usual. They did come in a black morph too which was quite attractive. I cannot recall one ever biting me, but like a Garter it will musk you quite readily until used to be handled. This pic from the internet looks similar to the ones I used to find, although not quite as rich green as I remember them being. It also looks a bit like it is in lower condition to me. But, you can see how the lip has similar pattern of dark edging to the individual scales like our water snakes have...which was why ours were considered Natrix as well for generations. But their build is quite different as is their behaviors. Ours are hyper aggressive compared to the European Water Snake. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1f/Natrix_natrix_persa3.jpg

longwinger2010
09-26-2010, 11:58 PM
I looked up Natrix natrix and the snake looks nothing like the one we saw and it says it is only found in the UK.confusedd

Yes I meant to refer to the Banded Water Snake..Natrix sipedon. My apologies !

conorhawk
09-27-2010, 12:02 AM
Nice Rattlesnakes Brandi. I would love to have ranch land that has a good population of snakes.

Micheal, that's a water snake as well. You guys are finding alot of those things.

Thanks for posting the snake pics, I love to see what you guys are finding in other parts of the country.

Here are a couple more snake pics from in the field.

West Coast Parrot Snake - Navajoa, Sonora.
http://fototime.com/796F84FF480AF22/standard.jpg

Baja Collard Lizard - Gonzaga Bay, Baja Norte. Not a snake but one of the coolest lizards in the west in my opinion. They prey mostly on smaller lizards.
http://fototime.com/ACA16482AE01CB4/standard.jpg

Speckled Racer - Alamos, Sonora. You guys in South Texas have these down there as well. An insane snake for sure.
http://fototime.com/3BA1C02B5187856/standard.jpg
Eric what kind of camera are you using to take these photographs? They are amazing!

Zarafia
09-27-2010, 12:12 AM
They changed the genera of our native water snake species many years ago. It is no longer in the Natrix genus. The Natrix of Europe is a much nicer snake, in many ways similar to our Garter Snake in disposition..not nearly as bitey. Get much larger in some cases. I caught one in the area north of Athens, Greece that was 5 feet long and quite thick...beautiful coloring with much smoother scales than our Garters have. Others were more in the size of Garter Snakes here...3 feet long was usual. They did come in a black morph too which was quite attractive. I cannot recall one ever biting me, but like a Garter it will musk you quite readily until used to be handled. This pic from the internet looks similar to the ones I used to find, although not quite as rich green as I remember them being. It also looks a bit like it is in lower condition to me. But, you can see how the lip has similar pattern of dark edging to the individual scales like our water snakes have...which was why ours were considered Natrix as well for generations. But their build is quite different as is their behaviors. Ours are hyper aggressive compared to the European Water Snake. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1f/Natrix_natrix_persa3.jpg


Our girl was never in trouble of mis-identification, she is part of a teaching program.
She is Agkistrodon piscivorous conanti.
Heat sensing pits between her eyes and nostrils. She looks like a venomous snake. No question about it IMHO.

PeteJ
09-27-2010, 05:33 AM
Yes I meant to refer to the Banded Water Snake..Natrix sipedon. My apologies !
They have changed that to Nerodia sipedon.

Jay
09-27-2010, 10:36 AM
Pete, isn't Nerodia fasciata the banded water snake, while Nerodia sipedon is the Northern Water Snake.

PeteJ
09-27-2010, 11:08 AM
Pete, isn't Nerodia fasciata the banded water snake, while Nerodia sipedon is the Northern Water Snake.
Probably, my point was that none of ours are Natrix genus anymore. It's been a decade or so since they were all changed.

sharpster
09-27-2010, 05:51 PM
yes, our 'grass snakes;natrix natrix,will musk you terribley as soon as you get your hands on them,a really big/aggresive one will hiss and dummy strike,but this is quite rare,if pushed they will feign death-roll over,tongue out!they are not as 'bulky' as your 'sipedon' and the u.s watersnakes i kept years ago,from imported wild stock,were way more aggresive!!!
we have a young captive natrix-they soon get used to being handled,and stop stinking-thank god!!

oh,and if all of you guys dont stop putting up pics of all the cracking snakes you have flaunting themselves,i will stop logging onto this site-its just not fair!!................

EricADugan
09-27-2010, 06:21 PM
All the snake photos Conor were taken with a Sony F717.
Eric

atcfalconry
09-28-2010, 09:09 AM
Hey Brandi

Do u ever take shots of the Frog Fest? I could imagine how tough it would be to get a cast of HH away from all that movement and commotion especially if they have their talons sunk into a big bull frog!!!!!

Pics please at least I know I would get a kick out of seeing that.

Dirthawking
09-28-2010, 09:30 AM
Hey Brandi

Do u ever take shots of the Frog Fest? I could imagine how tough it would be to get a cast of HH away from all that movement and commotion especially if they have their talons sunk into a big bull frog!!!!!

Pics please at least I know I would get a kick out of seeing that.

http://www.nafex.net/showthread.php?t=8594&highlight=wrecking+crew

Starts on post 67. Hard to get pictures of tons of little bull frogs hopping into the water. I was concentrating on the birds. Sorry.....

Ally
09-30-2010, 10:39 AM
I have no idea about snake ID, but you guys catching them are either braver or crazier than me!
Beautiful animals though. Great pictures!

atcfalconry
10-02-2010, 08:28 PM
http://www.nafex.net/showthread.php?t=8594&highlight=wrecking+crew

Starts on post 67. Hard to get pictures of tons of little bull frogs hopping into the water. I was concentrating on the birds. Sorry.....


Thanks mario!!!

I wonder if I can get my Harris chasing Bullfrogs into water maybe it will get him to be less shy of the ducks when they do not clear water. It drives me nuts when he does not commit as they dive back down and sit in 3 inches of water!!!

chamokane
10-03-2010, 04:05 PM
Identifying critters can be tough, and naming them can be even tougher since every generation of biologists wants to rename them themselves. There are a lot of experts.

When I was a kid, going to school in Barstow, a biology teacher brought in a snake he had caught the night before. It looked kind of like a cross between a bull snake and a rattle snake. He said that it was a perfect example of protective evolution, and that it was a bull snake that had evolved a wide head to look like a poisonous snake so predators would leave it alone.

That looked like pretty fast evolution for one individual to me, so the next time I was near the library, I looked it up and found that it was just a lyre snake, and that it's mama and daddy had looked like that too. Nice looking snake though.

Eagle Owl
10-03-2010, 09:24 PM
Here are some more pictures of the dangerous animals we have encountered while hunting this week.

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/GardenSpider.jpg

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Snake2_09302010.jpg

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Snake3_09302010.jpg

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Snake4_09302010.jpg


Now I know this next one does not look dangerous, but it has been hell on our plants!


http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Grasshopper_10032010.jpg

Hawkmom
10-03-2010, 09:32 PM
Talk about adaptive evolution. Rattlesnakes have been found in some areas that have no rattles. Since, the bison that once were in the millions are no longer around. The purpose of the rattle was to keep such animals away from the snake.

A few years ago, some people tried to give a 'vasectomy' to venomous snakes to have them safely handled. But a few months later the snakes died. Venom was found to be essential in helping to digest the prey. A friend of mine had a vasectomized spectacled cobra. Months later, the venom duct re-routed around the blocked ducts and came out behind the snake's eye. So, much for surgery. I don't think the procedure is done at all today.

Squirrelhawkin
10-03-2010, 09:35 PM
Talk about adaptive evolution. Rattlesnakes have been found in some areas that have no rattles. Since, the bison that once were in the millions are no longer around. The purpose of the rattle was to keep such animals away from the snake.

A few years ago, some people tried to give a 'vasectomy' to venomous snakes to have them safely handled. But a few months later the snakes died. Venom was found to be essential in helping to digest the prey. A friend of mine had a vasectomized spectacled cobra. Months later, the venom duct re-routed around the blocked ducts and came out behind the snake's eye. So, much for surgery. I don't think the procedure is done at all today.
Still done. They call them "venomoids" Two procedures,removing the glands or just cutting and tieing off the ducts. Not many of the Herp guys like the guys that do the procedures. The last show I went to in Pa. had shirts for sale that said 'Venomoids Suck!!!"

Dirthawking
10-03-2010, 09:37 PM
Talk about adaptive evolution. Rattlesnakes have been found in some areas that have no rattles. Since, the bison that once were in the millions are no longer around. The purpose of the rattle was to keep such animals away from the snake.

A few years ago, some people tried to give a 'vasectomy' to venomous snakes to have them safely handled. But a few months later the snakes died. Venom was found to be essential in helping to digest the prey. A friend of mine had a vasectomized spectacled cobra. Months later, the venom duct re-routed around the blocked ducts and came out behind the snake's eye. So, much for surgery. I don't think the procedure is done at all today.


The reptile store I worked at in Denver had a pair of albino diamondback rattlers. Both were de glanded (removal of the venom glands). Had been for years. We still took all precoutions when handling the snakes when cleaning cages. Snakes were checked by vet several times over the years to see if the glands came back. They never did come back.

As long as the entire gland is taken, the chance or regrowth is very small.

Squirrelhawkin
10-03-2010, 09:42 PM
The reptile store I worked at in Denver had a pair of albino diamondback rattlers. Both were de glanded (removal of the venom glands). Had been for years. We still took all precoutions when handling the snakes when cleaning cages. Snakes were checked by vet several times over the years to see if the glands came back. They never did come back.

As long as the entire gland is taken, the chance or regrowth is very small.

Did you have to put anything in their food to help digestion? One of the guys I talked to said they injected raw egg into the food.It had something to do with enzymes to help digestion.

Dirthawking
10-03-2010, 09:55 PM
Did you have to put anything in their food to help digestion? One of the guys I talked to said they injected raw egg into the food.It had something to do with enzymes to help digestion.


Nope. Just fed them jumbo rats. Never had a problem. Lost the female to egg binding after several years.

Venom is not used to help digest, just to immobilize prey and protection. Venom is only used to help digest in arachnids.

EricADugan
10-03-2010, 10:30 PM
Mario,
I would be curious where you got the idea that venom does not assist in meal digestion of viperid snakes? It is one of the most important aspects of the evolution of venom in snakes. Steve's 1988 paper is a great reference for this property of venom. This guy is widely considered as one of the world's foremost experts on snake venom. Here is a link to one of his papers that you might find interesting.
http://www.jstor.org/pss/1445927

Love the pictures of the herps guys. Keep em coming please.

Cheers,
Eric

Dirthawking
10-03-2010, 10:35 PM
That is an article that discusses differences in venoms within the same species and how they act toward different prey in immobilizing and pre digestion. Not in how the venom aids in digestion. Or am I missing something?

frootdog
10-04-2010, 03:35 AM
That is an article that discusses differences in venoms within the same species and how they act toward different prey in immobilizing and pre digestion.

What do you think pre digestion is? It's part of the digesting process, much like food being worked over in the crop is the 1st stage of digesting in raptors. Is the venom needed for this process? No. Is it helpful? Yes.

Dirthawking
10-04-2010, 10:11 AM
Actually, from what I gleamed from the article it was a look at different make ups of venom, and toxicity, within the species from baby to adult and how that venom acts towards specific prey. Not even pre digestion. Just prey in general. Reptiles for young snakes and rodents for adults. The only thing that I found in the article that mentions digestion/pre digestion is that some adults had higher protease levels that can break down protiens in the aid of digestion, but that toxicity levels in these snakes was also lower in the venom.

Great discussion, but as to not cloud the idea of this thread maybe we should start a new thread on this topic. I am enjoying this. :D

chamokane
10-04-2010, 12:55 PM
[QUOTE=Eagle Owl;148995]Here are some more pictures of the dangerous animals we have encountered while hunting this week.

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Snake3_09302010.jpg

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Snake4_09302010.jpg

The one wearing the hat and getting ready to eat the bull snake looks particularly dangerous.

Eagle Owl
10-04-2010, 01:03 PM
The one wearing the hat and getting ready to eat the bull snake looks particularly dangerous.

Dave,

That one is particularly scary! I was afraid for my life while taking those pictures!!! :D

patrick.miller20
10-04-2010, 05:41 PM
[QUOTE=Eagle Owl;148995]

The one wearing the hat and getting ready to eat the bull snake looks particularly dangerous.


We have a gopher snake where I work who is the nicest little snake ever. Loves to just hang off your arm. Handcuffed me one time in the middle of a program, which made for a very interesting presentation.

Mitchellbrad
10-04-2010, 06:29 PM
Nope. Just fed them jumbo rats. Never had a problem. Lost the female to egg binding after several years.

Venom is not used to help digest, just to immobilize prey and protection. Venom is only used to help digest in arachnids.

Gil Steig had and did venimoid snakes. The rattler he brought out here when he delivered an anatum to me was as healthy as a horse. I don't remember the type of rattler it was but that animal he could have left here if he wanted. It was nothing more than a couch potatoe. It would lay in your lap for hours just soaking up the heat. A very tractable animal. One of my kid's friends was handling it when Gil asked him if he liked that rattler. The kid went rigid until Gil explained about the proceedure. He did tell me some cobras were so into biting they would cause the operation to rupture which usually ended up killing the snake. For that reason he didn't do cobras.

wingnut
10-04-2010, 09:28 PM
[QUOTE=Eagle Owl;148995]Here are some more pictures of the dangerous animals we have encountered while hunting this week.

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Snake3_09302010.jpg

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Snake4_09302010.jpg

The one wearing the hat and getting ready to eat the bull snake looks particularly dangerous.

The way the snake is being handled makes it pretty obvious why you got bit up.

Dirthawking
10-04-2010, 09:43 PM
The way the snake is being handled makes it pretty obvious why you got bit up.

I stepped on the snake while we were out hunting. Krys picked it up to make sure it was okay and so the Harris's hawks did not grab it. Brandi snapped a few picks while Krys was checking it over. I think it was pissed over being stepped on then how Krys was holding it.

Eagle Owl
10-04-2010, 10:19 PM
The way the snake is being handled makes it pretty obvious why you got bit up.

Krys is a very capable snake handler. He was letting the snake bite him on purpose (don't ask me why...he is weird like thatcrazyy ). He was only holding the snake like that so I could get good pictures. I have about 50 more pics where Krys is properly handling the snake.

tony123abc
10-05-2010, 12:34 PM
http://www.preservevenomous.com/Venom_Vs_Poison/Venom_Vs_Poison.htm

Good info on venom vs poison and the what not.

IndianFalconer
10-05-2010, 01:07 PM
This is wht we came across while hawking last year. One of my Passage female Black shaheen landed just few meters aways from this Indian Rock Python.

http://i738.photobucket.com/albums/xx21/sollidlleo/44-3.jpg

chamokane
10-05-2010, 01:22 PM
This is wht we came across while hawking last year. One of my Passage female Black shaheen landed just few meters aways from this Indian Rock Python.

http://i738.photobucket.com/albums/xx21/sollidlleo/44-3.jpg

The snake looks like it has just eaten a falconer.:D

Dakota
10-05-2010, 01:24 PM
Now that would make your heart stop! How long was it?

IndianFalconer
10-05-2010, 01:28 PM
The snake looks like it has just eaten a falconer.:D

haha not 1 of us :D

IndianFalconer
10-05-2010, 01:31 PM
Now that would make your heart stop! How long was it?

I think more then 3 & a half meters.

cllhawker
10-11-2010, 06:14 PM
The snake looks like it has just eaten a falconer.:D

No that was the game warden looking at them earlier that day:eek:

robhawkyyz
10-11-2010, 06:53 PM
looks like we should all be current with a tetanus shot, just probably a good idea.

Dirthawking
10-11-2010, 07:04 PM
looks like we should all be current with a tetanus shot, just probably a good idea.


Just got mine this last week. I am good for the next 10 years! Bring it on....

michaelberan
10-11-2010, 07:18 PM
Just got mine this last week. I am good for the next 10 years! Bring it on....

My doctor told me 10 year "OR" if a major situation came up, like step on a rusty nail in New Orleans canal waters ....

Dirthawking
10-11-2010, 07:32 PM
My doctor told me 10 year "OR" if a major situation came up, like step on a rusty nail in New Orleans canal waters ....


Are you sure he did not just say going into the canal waters? I mean come on... I think you made the rusty nail part up! toungeout

frootdog
10-12-2010, 04:37 AM
The way the snake is being handled makes it pretty obvious why you got bit up.

Was not really worried about it since it was not venomous.

michaelberan
10-12-2010, 11:08 PM
Are you sure he did not just say going into the canal waters? I mean come on... I think you made the rusty nail part up! toungeout

OK you got me, I made the rusty nail part up, no worries though, now that I'm down here any metal in these canals gets so rusted it's like oatmeal

Jack
10-13-2010, 06:57 PM
About 30 years ago I was driving through northern Louisiana headed for Missippippi when I stopped at a truck stop. There was a man and a young girl sitting there with a couple of boxes sitting on the floor next to them. After eating they picked up the boxes and opened them. I was still eating, but real close to them so could see and hear everything said and done. The waitress asked if they were going to let her pet them. The little girl reached in and took out a huge diamond back and laid it into her lap. She sort of tucked it unto her purse. Then she took another one out of the other box and handed it across to her dad. Both snakes were alive and healthy, yet were quite laid back. She told me she had several more snakes, all just as tame and friendly as these were. I asked if they were packing and she said yes. From the shape of the heads I would say that they had a full charge of venom too. They fed them dead rats that were about half grown. Each ate several, and then were placed gently back into the boxes. They used no gloves, hooks or poles to handle them with. Just bare hands. I had a large female Mocassin back in the early 60's that was the same way with me, and I seen a guy feeding his king cobra by hand and he handled it without much care as he told me the snake would not bite him. He told me that it would not bite me either, but I for some reason could just not take his word for it. The big cobra scared me.

Jack

Eagle Owl
10-16-2010, 12:18 AM
Here are a few more critters we have encountered this week...

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/New%20RT/Sookie%202010-2011/Sookie4_10142010.jpg

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/New%20RT/Sookie%202010-2011/Snake_10142010.jpg


I know it doesn't look very big, but it is about 2 inches long.

http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/brandi7777/2010-2011%20Season/Bug_10122010.jpg

michaelberan
10-16-2010, 12:29 AM
stinky bug

Squirrelhawkin
10-16-2010, 09:35 AM
[QUOTE

I know it doesn't look very big, but it is about 2 inches long.

Can I put this line in as my entry for caption contest #17?:D

Eagle Owl
10-16-2010, 10:23 AM
Can I put this line in as my entry for caption contest #17?:D

That is just WRONG!!!!!!boxingg And certainly NOT true!!! :D ;)

hawkguy1
10-16-2010, 01:31 PM
lot of wasps.did you get stung?:eek:

Eagle Owl
10-16-2010, 01:49 PM
lot of wasps.did you get stung?:eek:

Mario has gotten stung once. Not too bad considering the number we have seen this year. We ran into 4 wasp nests just today.

frootdog
10-16-2010, 11:27 PM
[QUOTE

I know it doesn't look very big, but it is about 2 inches long.

Can I put this line in as my entry for caption contest #17?:D

clappclappclappbeeer

hawkstir
10-17-2010, 05:16 PM
This is one bush you don't want to hit with your stick.
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c397/hawkstir/100_0675.jpg
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c397/hawkstir/100_0674.jpg