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  1. #1
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    Default Gps with hawks

    Just curious if anyone was using Marshall gps on their hawk's, gos specifically? I'm looking at purchasing it, but would like some feedback.

    I've also heard a few people talk about having issues getting it to link up with the satellites. Has this improved?

    Thank you for any input.
    Chris

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwd56 View Post
    Just curious if anyone was using Marshall gps on their hawk's, gos specifically? I'm looking at purchasing it, but would like some feedback.

    I've also heard a few people talk about having issues getting it to link up with the satellites. Has this improved?

    Thank you for any input.
    I have used the MRT GPS system on a gos in wooded terrain and had no trouble acquiring satellites. In fact it worked pretty well in my living room and I have a metal roof so all of the signal was really coming from the bay window. Didn't work in the kitchen though....

    Be aware that any GPS receiver with batteries will take a while to acquire the satellites if it has to "cold start" minus the ephemeris data which allows it to start up faster. Depending on the cloud cover and such it can take a while but once it acquires enough satellites to get a fix you are good to go. That usually takes a few minutes. My Garmin GPS in the truck can take 5 minutes sometimes if the weather is crappy.
    Ron N1WT Vermont

  3. #3
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    I used the Marshall GPS system with my RT last season and it worked well. The only problem I had was using an ipad with a 'smart' case. The compass didn't work well, basically useless, with this case. It took a couple of hunts to figure out what was going on. Now I use a skin on the ipad mini without problems. Nice to be able to go directly to your bird after it carries prey.

    As far as the acquisition time, I agree with Ron. I used to turn it on when I got to the field and it would take a few minutes to get a fix. After missing a couple of opportunities at game as I drove into my hunting area, I started turning on as I left home, most of my places are less that 20 minutes away so I didn't waste much battery and I was ready to go immediately on arrival...

    One last thing, I started with a leg mount and my signal was a bit spotty at times. When I switched to a backpack the signal was much more stable.
    John

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkumetz View Post
    I have used the MRT GPS system on a gos in wooded terrain and had no trouble acquiring satellites.
    All wooded terrain is not created equal though. If Marshall wants a real test, I am happy to provide one. I'd love to hunt a goshawk in the same dense dark woods that they breed in around here.
    Geoff Hirschi - "It is better to have lightning in the fist than thunder in the mouth"
    Custom made Tail Saver Perches - http://www.myrthwood.com/TieEmHigh/

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by goshawkr View Post
    All wooded terrain is not created equal though. If Marshall wants a real test, I am happy to provide one. I'd love to hunt a goshawk in the same dense dark woods that they breed in around here.
    If I ever make it back out to Seattle, I will bring my system and you can show me what it is like to hunt with a Gos!!! That is if you will have me.
    John

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdrmd View Post
    If I ever make it back out to Seattle, I will bring my system and you can show me what it is like to hunt with a Gos!!! That is if you will have me.
    I'd love to take you out if you make it up here when I have one going. I am getting fed up with the rain though and leaving for sunnier climates in a few years.
    Geoff Hirschi - "It is better to have lightning in the fist than thunder in the mouth"
    Custom made Tail Saver Perches - http://www.myrthwood.com/TieEmHigh/

  7. #7
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    goshawker, does that mean we will see you in Southwestern New Mexico
    Jim
    New Mexican

  8. #8
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    Chris:

    I switched over from using a R400 VHF system on my male NA Goshawk to a Marshall UHF system 2 1/2 years ago.

    In the areas where I hunt, there is pretty heavy cover and a lot of 15 to 20 ft tall cedar. This environment contributed to my having to pull out the receiver 4 or more time every time I went out and with the UHF system I had a better/improved experience with respect to how long it took to find my bird.

    A year ago I picked up a Female Finnish Goshawk, and half way through last hunting season I added Marshall's Pocket Links and GPS transmitter paired with my iPhone 6+ to the equation.

    GPS is a game changer! No more pulling out the receiver, unfolding the antenna, scanning around to determine approximate direction, fiddling with settings to determine distance, and then folding up the antenna and putting the receiver back in its case after locating the bird. When in the field I carry my iPhone in a waterproof case attached to a lanyard worn around my neck. After a slip if I can't see my bird all I have to do is tilt up the iPhone case and I know exactly where she is.

    Although I also carried the UHF Receiver into the field with me as a backup every time I went out, I never had to use it. For this upcoming season, I'll probably leave it in the truck.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by joekoz View Post
    Chris:

    I switched over from using a R400 VHF system on my male NA Goshawk to a Marshall UHF system 2 1/2 years ago.

    In the areas where I hunt, there is pretty heavy cover and a lot of 15 to 20 ft tall cedar. This environment contributed to my having to pull out the receiver 4 or more time every time I went out and with the UHF system I had a better/improved experience with respect to how long it took to find my bird.

    A year ago I picked up a Female Finnish Goshawk, and half way through last hunting season I added Marshall's Pocket Links and GPS transmitter paired with my iPhone 6+ to the equation.

    GPS is a game changer! No more pulling out the receiver, unfolding the antenna, scanning around to determine approximate direction, fiddling with settings to determine distance, and then folding up the antenna and putting the receiver back in its case after locating the bird. When in the field I carry my iPhone in a waterproof case attached to a lanyard worn around my neck. After a slip if I can't see my bird all I have to do is tilt up the iPhone case and I know exactly where she is.

    Although I also carried the UHF Receiver into the field with me as a backup every time I went out, I never had to use it. For this upcoming season, I'll probably leave it in the truck.
    Thanks Joe, this is what I was hoping to see.
    Chris

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by joekoz View Post
    Although I also carried the UHF Receiver into the field with me as a backup every time I went out, I never had to use it. For this upcoming season, I'll probably leave it in the truck.
    Joe, I carried my receiver for half of last season...never needed it. Now I keep it in the truck and enjoy carrying less weight and gear in the field.
    John

  11. #11
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    With the gps system, what exactly is needed and what does the total cost end up being? Also, does the gps transmitter also transmit uhf so you can use a uhf receiver if the gps fails?
    Fred
    "Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FredFogg View Post
    With the gps system, what exactly is needed and what does the total cost end up being? Also, does the gps transmitter also transmit uhf so you can use a uhf receiver if the gps fails?


    Hey Fred,

    I'm sure Ron or Tom can provide more technical information; but, it's my understanding that you need the UHF system in order to use the GPS. The GPS is a separate unit that relays GPS information to your iOS enabled device. It also transmits UHF as a backup in case the GPS goes out. Although, the UHF signal could be the carrier wave for the GPS information?? I guess that doesn't stand to reason as your iOS enabled device (more than likely) isn't set up as a 434 receiver. Although, the pocketlink could be setup to receive the 434 signal encoded with the GPS data and transmit more user friendly information to your iOS enabled device via Bluetooth? I'm just thinking out loud, here. Hopefully someone will be along shortly to give a more informed answer! I'm not 100% certain.

    I do know Marshall's website says you need the UHF system to use to GPS. Suffice to say you'll be spending a fair amount if you don't already have a UHF system. I priced the whole setup with a few extras (and buying a FM500 vs. the FM100) and I was right at $2,000. I also threw in the case and a few other things. End of day I think you could get out of the deal for around $1,700 if you didn't go bananas; but, why wouldn't you?
    Boomer
    Quote Originally Posted by keitht View Post
    It doesn't bother me traveling in wilderness alone. It bothers others. I think it would be a great way to die.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by raptrlvr View Post
    goshawker, does that mean we will see you in Southwestern New Mexico
    Not sure. Wife and I are currently debating where our next stop will be.
    Geoff Hirschi - "It is better to have lightning in the fist than thunder in the mouth"
    Custom made Tail Saver Perches - http://www.myrthwood.com/TieEmHigh/

  14. #14
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    Fred - you can program several different frequencies in the 433 or 434 band. If I'm not mistaken, the 100 or 500 in FM100/FM500 means it's capable of receiving that many different frequencies in its respective band. In reality, you'd want to space them out a bit so nothing overlaps. I believe 434 is more common with falconers and, if I'm not mistaken, some other commercial entity is using 433. Again, I'm sure Ron or Tom will come along and right the ship, again, but, if my understanding is half-ass accurate, I'm pretty sure with 5 (hz??) of separation, you could still use 100 different transmitters with a FM500, all on different frequencies.

    The reason I'm going to buy a FM500 in 434 is to maximize my ability to help other falconers in the area who are on UHF.

    Hopefully I'm not too far off the mark because this has been my logic behind planning to buy the FM500 in 434. I'm definitely looking forward to some input from Ron/Tom now as it might save me some money!
    Boomer
    Quote Originally Posted by keitht View Post
    It doesn't bother me traveling in wilderness alone. It bothers others. I think it would be a great way to die.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ducksanddogs View Post
    Fred - you can program several different frequencies in the 433 or 434 band. If I'm not mistaken, the 100 or 500 in FM100/FM500 means it's capable of receiving that many different frequencies in its respective band. In reality, you'd want to space them out a bit so nothing overlaps. I believe 434 is more common with falconers and, if I'm not mistaken, some other commercial entity is using 433. Again, I'm sure Ron or Tom will come along and right the ship, again, but, if my understanding is half-ass accurate, I'm pretty sure with 5 (hz??) of separation, you could still use 100 different transmitters with a FM500, all on different frequencies.

    The reason I'm going to buy a FM500 in 434 is to maximize my ability to help other falconers in the area who are on UHF.

    Hopefully I'm not too far off the mark because this has been my logic behind planning to buy the FM500 in 434. I'm definitely looking forward to some input from Ron/Tom now as it might save me some money!
    Boomer,

    Marshal has been "steering" the falconry community to 434 MHz by not offering a 433-100 as a catalog item.There are no "commercial" users on 433 other than the entire world on the 433.92 MHz European car door opener frequency. Short of a full embargo of the Chinese postal system there is no keeping 100,00 devices a week from going on line at this frequency. The Ham Radio folks and the FCC have declared this frequency a lost cause and walked away. For So. Cal. there is amateur TV at 434.00. I am not sure how often this becomes annoying. For the rest of the country I either don't know or recommend 434.

    The FM434-500 gives you 50 channels each 10 KHz wide. No problem putting two transmitters on each channel with 5 KHz spacing.

    On GPS, it's all software. Check direct with Marshall. Last I heard they were developing a two transmitters at once app for the Gulf market. This could then transfer over into tracking a cast of falcons in Europe and America. Check my thread in Telemetry on New UHF Receivers.

    Regards,
    Thomas of the Desert
    Tom Munson, Buckeye, AZ
    619-379-2656, tom@munson.us

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Gizmo View Post
    On GPS, it's all software. Check direct with Marshall. Last I heard they were developing a two transmitters at once app for the Gulf market. This could then transfer over into tracking a cast of falcons in Europe and America. Check my thread in Telemetry on New UHF Receivers.
    Marshall recently showed the prototype dog collar at a UK falconry fair and revealed they are currently working on a software update to allow multiple RT GPS's/ dog collars to connect to a single PocketLink.

    Details will follow in due course but I for one am really looking forward to the day I can run both my pointer and my hawk from a single device.

    Sam Houston.

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